Category Archives: Dry Ice Blasting

mold tooling

Dry Ice Cleaning for Mold Tooling

Dry ice cleaning is helping rubber and plastic molders to improve part quality and reduce operational costs. Dry ice cleaning, or dry ice blasting as it’s also known, removes fouling and residues from injection molds and other types of metal tooling. This safe, clean process won’t harm mold surfaces or their finishes and eliminates time-consuming […]

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dry ice blasting for injection mold cleaning

Dry Ice Blasting Update – Fall 2022

Dry Ice Shortage At the present time there is a shortage of dry ice available in the United States. This shortage is expected to alleviate by some point this fall. Nitrofreeze has contracts with a dry ice supplier to minimize delays in production, however, we can still complete dry ice blasting jobs at our facility […]

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medical injection molding | medical silicone parts

Why Medical Injection Molding Uses Cryogenic Deflashing

Medical injection molding supports the use of a wide variety of plastic and rubber materials. Examples include PEEK, polycarbonate, and LSR – just to name a few. During the injection molding process, excess material known as flash can escape the mold and mar part surfaces. The causes of flash are numerous and include parting line […]

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emi shielding gaskets deflashing

Deflashing EMI Shielding Gaskets and EMI O-Rings

Nitrofreeze® provides deflashing services for EMI shielding gaskets and EMI O-rings. These environmental seals and EMI shields are made of electrically conductive silicones, elastomers that are filled with metal or metal-coated particles to provide protection against electromagnetic interference (EMI), a growing problem with electronic devices and electrical equipment At our Worcester, Massachusetts (USA) facility, Nitrofreeze® […]

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Dry Ice Blasting - Peeling Paint

Dry Ice Blasting During Planned Shutdowns

Planned shutdowns give manufacturers an opportunity to clean and maintain facilities and equipment. For some companies, planned downtime in December makes the most sense because the company is closed for Christmas and New Year’s anyway. Other businesses prefer summer shutdowns, especially around the Fourth of July, because it’s when many employees take their annual vacations. […]

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